Recipes

On Grief and Seared Ahi Tuna with Black Rice

Seared Ahi Tuna with Black Rice
Two weeks ago, my fiancé received terrible news–his recently retired father (ז״ל) passed away suddenly from a heart-attack.  His mother was beside herself with grief and–or at least we thought–she was alone.

Mr. and Mrs. Future-in-laws, on their wedding day

My fiance’s parents on their wedding day

Those we love and lose are always connected by heartstrings into infinity.

— Terri Guillemets

I immediately began researching flights out to see her on the opposite coast, and we flew out to be by her side the next evening.  It was a difficult time for us, but also spiritually enriching.  We watched as neighbors and friends poured in to offer support, to help with the hurry of planning a funeral that no one could have expected.  They were there to simply offer their presence.  To see the outpouring of love from people was incredible.

As it turns out, this was the first time I was meeting my future in-laws in person.  Certainly not ideal, but proof that life is full of surprises.

I cannot speak for the grief of my fiancé or my mother-in-law.  Grief is an intensely personal experience, but it certainly brought flooding in memories of my father’s passing.  My fiancé and I sat in his parents’ kitchen one evening and talked until we found ourselves in the dark, too occupied with conversation to consider turning on the light. It was then that I recalled with clarity how surreal these moments were for my mother and me.

My personal beliefs in the afterlife are, what I like to call, squishy.  I haven’t given it much thought, relegating that which is supernatural as being too complicated for humans to ponder with any certainty.  Rather, I believe firmly in the afterlife that is certain: our legacy.  My fiancé’s father leaves behind a legacy of being a good man. A man who took care of his family and friends alike.

If the people we love are stolen from us, the way to have them live on is to never stop loving them.

— James O’ Barr

As a result of this event, I have not felt up to writing, cooking, or much more than simply appreciating the company of my fiancé.  To comfort him, I decided to make one of his favorite dishes: Seared Marinated Ahi Tuna served with “forbidden” black rice.

Forbidden Rice

“Forbidden Rice” is a name for black rice that, as legend has it, was once reserved for the Emperor in ancient China. Black rice is high in nutrients–more so than even brown rice–including 8.5 protein, 3.5 iron, 4.9 fiber, and the highest amount of antioxidants of any rice variety. It also has a striking aesthetic, making for a beautiful accompaniment.

Seared Ahi Tuna

Seared Ahi Tuna with Black Rice

Ahi Tuna with Black Rice

 

I served this with white asparagus.  As a side note, Almost Kosher is going healthy (as a promise to my future mother-in-law).  Look forward to more salads and vegetable dishes, as well as an improved recipe format in my coming posts.

 

Seared Ahi Tuna


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Seared Ahi Tuna with Black Rice
Seared Ahi Tuna
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Course Main Dish
Cuisine Japanese
Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 2 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Japanese
Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 2 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Seared Ahi Tuna
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Add to Shopping List
This recipe is in your Shopping List
Instructions
  1. In a shallow dish, mix the soy sauce, ginger, and wasabi.
  2. Lay the tuna steaks in the mixture and allow to sit about 10 minutes, flip and let sit again for 10 minutes.
  3. Sear the steaks for about one minute on each side over either a scorching grill or cast iron pan, or use a high powered torch like my Bernzomatic TS8000.
  4. Plate with the cooked black rice. I shaped mine by spooning it into a ramekin and flipping it over onto a plate. A couple of taps on the bottom of the ramekin ensures a nearly perfectly clean transfer.