Recipes

Focus! When OCD mimics ADD…& Black Rice Sushi

I zoned out in a meeting today.  It’s a common experience, I’m aware.  As was my being hopelessly unsure of what topic I was asked to opine.  However, it is one that happens more often to me than I care to admit.  No matter how hard I try, I can’t seem to get myself to focus on the topic I should focus on.  Focus isn’t the issue; it’s the object of that focus that is questionable.  Indeed, I can focus just fine.  In fact, I can concentrate for hours on a single and incredibly narrow topic.  I have obsessive-compulsive disorder (known as OCD), but doctors misdiagnosed me for years as having ADD.

The media doesn’t portray OCD fairly.  Thus, there are a lot of misconceptions about the disorder.  When they hear “OCD” most people envision someone being perhaps a bit cleaner than the average person, or maybe lining up pencils just so on their desk.  Maybe they think of someone who must lock the door three times before leaving for work in the morning.  While these examples are accurate for some people with OCD, these by no means represent the whole of the population experiencing this disorder.

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 How OCD can affect focus

While the “compulsive” part of this disorder gets the majority of the attention, it’s the “obsessive” part which drives this disorder.  The compulsions come about as a way to prevent something bad from happening, dictated by an obsessive thought.  It’s usually a result of some superstition or “magical thinking;” without this, it’s not OCD.  A clean person without these ideas isn’t OCD; they’re just particular.

Physical rituals are not my problem, but mental ones.  I don’t clean compulsively (although, I am neat) and I don’t complete observable rituals.  However, I have intrusive thoughts. Those obsessions don’t always come at desirable times.

The Desirable Problem

Well-meaning people like to tell me that OCD is a good mental illness to have.  Or that, “at least it isn’t something bad!”  Or that they’re “OCD” about something, too (sorry folks, OCD is a noun, not an adjective).  I let them.  I play along.  But it’s not true–OCD is debilitating and affects relationships with others.  It causes anxiety and paranoia.  I sometimes think in unusual ways.  It diverts my attention from things that are important to others as well as myself.

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Black Rice Sushi

Black rice sushi was my fixation during the meeting.  Specifically, I had become curious about the origins of black rice.  This later became a fascination about the history of sushi.  The meeting had no hope of saving me from zoning out.  It was no competition.

You might remember awhile back I shared my discovery of black rice.  Recently, I wondered how it would do in sushi.  It turns out that it’s just absolutely gorgeous.  It’s easy, too: just cook it in on the stove top or in your rice cooker the same as you would brown rice.  Here we just rolled it up with some sushi-grade salmon, cucumber, and avocado.  I mixed up a little sriracha with mayo for a few of the rolls to make a spicy option as well.

You don’t need any special equipment (i.e., a sushi-rolling mat) to make sushi at home.  We just used a hand towel with a layer of plastic wrap to make a makeshift mat.  No need for extra kitchen clutter.

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Sushi with Black Rice
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Servings
people
Ingredients
For seasoned rice
For Sushi Fillings
Servings
people
Ingredients
For seasoned rice
For Sushi Fillings
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Add to Shopping List
This recipe is in your Shopping List
Instructions
  1. To your still hot, cooked rice, add vinegar, sugar, and salt. Mix together and allow rice to cool.
  2. Place a folded thin kicthen towel on a flat surface. Top with plastic wrap, then with a sheet of nori.
  3. Dip your hands in water to help prevent the rice from sticking to them and pat a very thin layer of rice all over the nori.
  4. Add your desired toppings in a line near the bottom--but not at--of the nori sheet.
  5. Roll the sushi by carefully tucking the nori in on itself to hug the fillings. Then use the towel to help roll and shape. If you've never done this before, seach youtube for a video.
  6. Put each completed roll in the freezer as you move to the next one. This will help make it easier to slice when you're done.
  7. After all of your rolls are complete, remove any in the freezer, wet a very sharp knife, and cut into even slices.
  8. Serve immediately with pickled ginger, soy sauce and wasabi.
Recipe Notes

Adapted from Minimalist Baker

Sushi-5So easy, healthy, and fun to make as a family.  The fiancé even learned how to roll his own and offered to finish up making the rest of the rolls!

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