Holidays as the Only Jew in the Office & Hanukkah Sous Vide Turkey Roast

21 December 2016

“Oh, dreidel, dreidel, dreidel / I made you out of clay / And when you’re dry and ready / Oh Dreidel we shall play”

Two coworkers sang this song to me this morning, neither of them Jewish.  A little context:

Yesterday I handed out holiday gifts at my office, a practice I’ve never participated in before.  I prepared bags of chocolate gelt and dreidels, together with a small instruction sheet on how to play the dreidel game.  Year after year, I’ve received Christmas gifts from my colleagues, and year after year I struggled with what I perceived to be an awkward conflict of interest.  I also had never much appreciated feeling guilted into giving.  I’ll chalk that last one up to youth.

hanukkiah

An antique Hanukkiah we saw in the souks in Marrakech

This year, however, my attitude changed.  I don’t know if the change of heart can be attributed to Hanukkah and Christmas occurring so close together this year or being softened by the warmth of starting a new family with my husband.  Either way, I decided to participate.  I even decorated my desk with an electronic Hanukkiah (the special Hanukkah menorah) and a decorative dreidel.  I didn’t do this to announce to the world that I don’t celebrate Christmas, but instead to join in the season’s joy.

sous vide turkey roast

Whatever you celebrate, let’s all agree that sous vide turkey roast belongs in it.

It’s the thought that counts…

This year a coworker assured me that her Christmas present to me wasn’t meant to be offensive; she hadn’t known we were Jewish.  While I can’t speak for all Jews, I certainly didn’t find offense in a thoughtful gift.  I also hope no Christians felt offense that I gave a Hanukkah-themed gift.  I don’t worry if someone wishes me a Merry Christmas instead of Happy Holidays.  And I think that should work both ways.  Many people balk at the generic “Happy Holidays” greeting as somehow watering down their Christmas holiday, without noticing that some of us do feel a bit out of the celebration.  Then again, a friend once asked me–in a serious manner–why Jews don’t celebrate Christmas.

So my holiday wish this year is, whatever you celebrate…happy that.

Saffron mashed potatoes using the saffron we scored in Morocco accompany our turkey roast

Hanukkah Holiday Sous Vide Turkey Roast

Without further ado, I bring to you a sous vide turkey breast guaranteed to satisfy your guests this season.  For us, it’s a Hanukkah sous vide turkey roast, served alongside saffron mashed potatoes and a Moroccan-spiced cranberry chutney.  For you, it may be a Festivus sous vide turkey roast.  Label it however you like, it’ll be delicious either way.  Gone is the dry turkey breast of a traditional roast, as well as any danger associated with the fried turkey (although, don’t get me wrong, fried turkey is da bomb…or whatever kids say these days).

sous vide turkey roast

Sous vide turkey roast is perfectly moist and evenly cooked

Print Recipe
Sous Vide Turkey Breast
sous vide turkey roast
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Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 3 hours
Servings
people
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 3 hours
Servings
people
sous vide turkey roast
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Add to Shopping List
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Instructions
  1. Preheat sous vide to 62° C / 145° F.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together the olive oil, garlic, and salt and pepper.
  3. Rub the oil mixture onto your turkey breast, being careful to get every inch covered.
  4. Seal either in a large, Ziplock style bag using the water displacement method or using a vacuum sealer, place into the water bath, and cook for 3-4 hours.
  5. After the turkey is finished cooking, remove from the bag and pat dry.
  6. Broil the turkey under high heat until the skin browns and crisps up. Slice and serve!
Recipe Notes

Please see the table found here for temperature safety.

By the way, back to the dreidel song above.  Both of these coworkers had given their dreidels I gifted to their children.  Apparently, these coworker’s children had been taught the dreidel song this year as part of a curriculum that includes all of the season’s holidays.  The kids were delighted by them…news which honestly made my day.

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2 Comments

  • Reply Cinnamon 24 December 2016 at 9:17 am

    Very nice. I like that you have been able to join in the holiday spirit with your own religion.

    • Reply Chava 24 December 2016 at 10:44 am

      Thank you, Cinnamon! It really is a wonderful time of year.

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