Holidays, Recipes

Chocolate Stout Hamantaschen for Purim & St. Paddy’s Day

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Almost a year ago I wrote on this very blog that I would not bake hamantaschen for you.  I had been too intimidated, citing reasons founded in my childhood for why I refused to bake.  Yet, here I am posting a recipe for an excellent Chocolate Stout Hamantaschen.  What gives?

chocolate stout hamantaschen for purim

In the past year, a lot has changed.  I have finished a whole college school year, the then-fiance became the now-husband, and I have had a lot of time to read.  Specifically, I’ve been reading a lot about baking.  I’ve been experimenting and tasting.  Trying to break that mystery which has eluded me for so long and–finally!–I broke through.  I can’t tell you when I exactly reached that a-ha! moment, only that I did.  And thanks to that breakthrough, the recipe I’m sharing with you today now exists.

Two Spring Holidays | Two Cultures

Being both Irish and Jewish, the proximity of the Purim holiday with St. Paddy’s day has been convenient. Both festivals give alcohol a strong supporting role.  Both require merriment and good food.  They’re both Spring holidays, perhaps with very different origins, but similar celebrations.

Purim

As a Jew, Purim is probably my favorite holiday.  It’s joyous and fun, whether you imbibe or you choose to simply dress up.  Our synagogue, like so many others, throws a huge party.  We always have a theme (this year it’s Marvel) and members dress up either in theme or in whatever costume tickles their fancy that year.  We listen to the story of Esther, jeering at the part of Haman and cheering for Mordechai.  All the while, we drink. We drink until we can no longer distinguish the Hamans from the Mordechais.  And we Uber ourselves to avoid DUIs.

St. Paddy’s Day

As an Irish woman, St. Paddy’s Day is my only holiday.  In fact, people without any known Irish heritage can be found wearing shirts and pins advertising, “Kiss me I’m Irish.”  It’s similarly a joyous holiday, centered around a lot of drinking.  People drink green beer, eat “Irish” foods, and dress up in green.

Chocolate Stout Hamantaschen

Chocolate Chocolate Stout Hamantaschen-4
RECIPE-1
Chocolate Chocolate Stout Hamantaschen-1

This chocolate stout hamantaschen recipe attempts to bring the two holidays together.  Guinness is incorporated into our standard chocolate ganache filling to give the Jewish cookie some Irish flair.  The dough is sweet and distinctly chocolate-y while the filling takes on a more bittersweet taste.

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Chocolate Stout Hamantaschen
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
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Course Dessert
Servings
cookies
Ingredients
Hamantaschen Dough
Stout Ganache
Course Dessert
Servings
cookies
Ingredients
Hamantaschen Dough
Stout Ganache
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Add to Shopping List
This recipe is in your Shopping List
Instructions
  1. Cut room temperature butter into large chunks and place into a mixing bowl. Add sugar and brown sugar. Using electric hand mixers or a stand mixer, mix until creamed. Add egg and vanilla extract and mix until fluffy and mixed through. Set aside.
  2. In another mixing bowl, combine flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, and salt. Mix. Add to butter mixture and allow to mix until it gathers into a ball. If the dough is too crumbly, add 1/4 cup of water at a time until it comes together.
  3. With clean hands, knead well until soft and form into a disc. Wrap with saran wrap and chill in your fridge for about 15 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile, prepare your ganache filing by adding your chopped chocolate into a heat-safe bowl.
  5. In a small saucepan, add the cream and Guinness and bring to a boil. Pour boiling mixture over the chocolate.
  6. Stir the chocolate until well mixed and add the butter. Stir again until butter is melted and mixed in.
  7. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Grease two baking sheets.
  8. Remove dough from fridge and seperate into quarters.
  9. Place dough between two sheets of parchament and with a rolling pin, roll out until about 1/8 inch thick.
  10. With a small round cookie cutter, cut as many circles as possible out of each quarter dough ball. Line the circles up on your baking sheets.
  11. After all your circles are complete, spoon a small (about 1/2 teaspoon) dollop of ganache into the center of each and fold each circle into little triangles.
  12. Pinch all the corners of your triangles to ensure they are tight, then move to the oven to bake for about 10-12 minutes.
  13. Remove the sheets from the oven when done, and move the cookies to a wire rack to cool.
  14. Store at room temperature for 3-5 days or wrap tightly and freeze for up to 3 months.

How about you?  Does your family celebrate any hybrid holidays?

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